Prescription Anti-smoking Drug Champix Increases Chance of Heart Attacks and Stokes is Linked to Suicides

Prescription Anti-smoking Drug Champix Increases Chance of Heart Attacks and Stokes is Linked to Suicides

Doctors have warned that an anti-smoking drug could increase the chances of having a heart attack or a stroke.
There have been reviews on the anti-smoking drug Champix and tests showed that people who stopped using it were almost twice as likely to be taken to hospital with heart problems than those who took placebos when trying to give up.
Most of the people in the studies didn’t have latent heart problems when they began taking Champix.
Champix was first introduced in 2006 and was prescribed nearly a million times in the UK last year. The drug works by decreasing the mental craving for nicotine and the enjoyment of having a cigarette.
Dr Loke told the Daily Mail that he believed the drugs raised the chances of a heart attack because he thought that Champix may cause the heart to beat out of step. He added that users may have nightmares and it could cause insomnia which puts extra strain on the heart.
Dr Loke worked with American colleagues and analysed the results of 14 studies of the Pfizer manufactured drugs which involved more than 8000 smokers.
The results showed that out of 4908 people who were taking Champix 52 of them had heart problems and out of the 3308 who took the placebos only 27 had heart problems.
The drug previously known as vareniciline has also been linked to psychiatric problems 37 suicides and hundreds of suicidal thoughts.
If you have been affected by something of a similar nature then you must take the following steps:
1. Contact your GP and advise him of your condition
2. Keep the box/packaging or any Receipts you have as proof of purchase.
3. Contact a member of our team on 0113 200 9720

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