The FSA are Battling Campylobacter Bug

The FSA are Battling Campylobacter Bug

The FSA have launched a strategy in the hope that it will cut the number of food poisoning cases from supermarket chickens. They have warned that the strategy would turn to regulation if retailers didn’t go the extra mile to reduce the threat.
The Campylobacter is the UK’s most common cause of food poisoning and is thought to be the root of 460000 cases of food poisoning 22000 people having to be admitted to hospital and 110 deaths annually.
FSA Chief executive Catherine Brown said.
“What we proposed in this paper is a shift in culture and a refocusing of effort both government and the food industry to tackle this persistent and serious problem”
Catherine will be meeting with retail leaders today to talk through the plan.
“While we remain committed to joint working with industry we want to encourage and see producers processors and retailers treat campylobacter reduction not simply as a technical issue but as a core business priority – and I see some encouraging signs of that happening.”
Brown has said that the FSA will provide more information which is clearer about campylobacter and the supply chain.
According to thegrocer.co.uk the FSA will
‘address regulatory barriers to the adoption of safe and effective technological innovations; and work with local government partners and others to raise awareness.’
A survey by the FSA into the chicken on sale in the UK in 2007-8 showed that 65% of shop chickens were infected with campylobacter. The FSA said that there had been no change in the number of chicken infected with the bacteria.
The FSA will be implementing more measures for research programmes into long term interventions to address the issues including vaccination.
Read the original story from greengrocer.co.uk here
This is an ongoing battle for the FSA see our earlier story on dirty chicken here

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