Man with Tumour the Size of a Tennis Ball Wrongly Diagnosed with Depression

Man with Tumour the Size of a Tennis Ball Wrongly Diagnosed with Depression

Man with tumour the size of a tennis ball wrongly diagnosed with depression
Three GPs were saw Chris Buckley aged 34 before he eventually attended Accident and Emergency where he was correctly diagnosed with a brain tumour.
Mr Buckley’s father complained to the General Medical Council about the actions of the GPS and the delay in diagnosing his son’s tumour. The GMC concluded that two of the doctors’ had fallen ‘seriously below that expected of a reasonably competent GP’ while the third failed to consider other causes of a speech problem that had set in.
Mr Buckley initially attended at GP in December 2011 because he was struggling to talk and could not remember some words. He attended with girlfriend who had to speak for him because his speech had got so bad and was prescribed with antidepressant citalopram and sleeping tablets and also referred for counselling.
Mr Buckley’s condition worsened over the New Year and but when he attended a second GP he was again prescribed more antidepressants.
By the end of January Mr Buckley was unable to speak but instead of being referred for further tests in hospital he was referred to a mental health unit.
After noticing that their son could not use his right hand Mr Buckley’s parents telephoned NHS direct who advised them to take their son directly to Accident and Emergency. The brain tumour which by this point was the size of a tennis ball was finally diagnosed and Mr Buckley was admitted. Sadly MR Buckley deteriorated rapidly after this and he died two months later in hospital.
Following their investigation the GMC told two of the GPs involved in Mr Buckley’s care to reflect on the findings of independent expert Dr Leonard Peter while it was concluded that there was no further action needed for the third GP.
Malcolm Buckley believes his son may have received better treatment sooner if he had been properly assessed and diagnosed.
He said: ‘If a doctor can’t examine a patient they shouldn’t be in practice or allowed to examine other patients.’
Dr Oginsanya one of the GP’s involved commented following the GMC’s investigations:
"We need to be more alert to other causes. Unfortunately he saw three different doctors at different times. If a patient comes back and has not improved we need to vigorously assess why they are not getting better.’
The hospital accepted there had been a prescribing error but said the drug was sometimes prescribed to tumour sufferers.
A practice spokesman for Dr Wissa and Dr Tayo the other two GP’s involved commented:
"Even though Mr Buckley has spoken publicly we are unable to discuss confidential details of patient care. The GMC conducted a thorough investigation and made no recommendations for action. We offer our sincere condolences to the family."
If you or a family member has suffered as a result of a delay in diagnosing a serious illness please contact the Medical Negligence department at Michael Lewin Solicitors on 0844 844 9866 for free advice and consultation on your prospective case. Michael Lewin Solicitors Medical Negligence department has experience in dealing with cases involving unacceptable delays in diagnosing cancer resulting in premature death. They would happy to assess the prospects of your claim and discuss making a medical negligence claim with you.

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