Calls for the Government to get rid of Zero Hours Contracts

Calls for the Government to get rid of Zero Hours Contracts

Seeing the news that Government is being asked to abolish “zero hours” contracts means great news for employees. This marks a positive change and means that employees are guaranteed a minimum amount of work.
The zero hours contracts mean that workers do not have a promise of a minimum number of hours of work each week and therefore there is no guarantee of a stable income.
Statistics show that the number of people employed on zero hours contracts have risen considerably in the last few years:
200000 people from October to December 2012;
151000 people from October to December 2009;
And 131000 people were on zero hours contracts from October to December 2007.
These figures appear to demonstrate the effect of the recent economic downturn on employers and as an alternative to making people redundant they have implemented zero hour contracts in an attempt to find a way to lay people off. They would then claim that they do not have an obligation to provide employees with a minimum number of working hours. Employers would then increase hours when the work is available.
On the 23rd May 2013 it was revealed that the House of Lords employs 26 people on the catering staff team and 19 people who work for Hansard on zero hours contracts.
Zero hours contract tend to be given to workers between the ages of 18 and 25. Whilst employers argue that these contracts are a way to keep people in employment instead of making them redundant in the current economic climate employees with homes and families to support are looking for a stable income. Instead they are in a position where employers can change their shifts and working pattern at will and employees do not necessarily have any redundancy rights.
Author: Anthony Fox

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